Wednesday, August 07, 2019

Language policies in schools

According to Nikki Stein's Languge in schools, "Section 29(2) of the Constitution provides that every learner has the right to receive a basic education in the language of his or her choice, where this is reasonably practicable. This right is an important recognition of equality and diversity, and the need to depart from a history in which education – and language in education, in particular – was used as a vehicle to implement and strengthen apartheid. Through this right, learners’ diversity and individuality is recognised, and this can facilitate the important objective of unlocking their potential." 

We spoke to Mbulungeni Madiba who is an Associate Professor and Co-ordinator of the Multilingualism Education Project at the University of Cape Town. He obtained his MA in African languages and DLitt et Phil in Linguistics at the University of South Africa. He has studied in Germany where he spent six months at the University of Cologne and was an Oppenheimer Fellow at the University of London (SOAS). He was also a Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Birmingham and a Mandela Fellow at Harvard University. He has published widely on language planning and policy.

Miracle girl: A book of bravery and resilience


 "Vovo always had a smile and never complained; she made jokes and kept all our spirits up. This,of course, was the wrong way around as we were all so worried about her. We were trying so hard to keep on a brave face through everything. She always remained calm and I believed in Vovo’s quiet strength and positivity. The doctors and nurses all, by comparison, seemed a little gloomy, but Vovo told me many times, ‘Tony, I will beat this!’" That was an extract from the book "Miracle girl" 


Sivusethu "Vovo" Ndubela, a 19 year old girl from New Brighton, Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape. This moving autobiography that details the trials Vovo had to endure from death, life threatening obstacles and the socioeconomic hardships that come with living in the township .This autobiography will have you laughing hysterically at the mischief she got up and have you drenched in tears from the hardships she has endured throughout her young life. We had a chance to speak to the autho, Sivusethu "Vovo" Ndubela about her childhood, the hardships she endure and what kept her fighting through her life-threatening condition.



Sowing dignity in underprivileged women, one wiing at a time




Girls With Wiings  is an organisation that sows hope and restores the dignity of homeless and underprivileged women. We are achieving this by distributing sanitary products to homeless & underprivileged women on a monthly basis.

Founded in June 2016 with the NPO registration confirmed on the 10th of July 2018,Girls with wiings has distributed over 6,000 sanitary products to women & girls in need. We spoke to the founder of the initiativeKoinonia Baloyi to find out about the inspiration behind Girls with wiings and why she uses fitness particularly running as a way to raise awareness on personal female hygiene that greatly affects underprivileged women

Saturday, August 03, 2019

“If you can’t feed a hundred people then feed just one.”


According to the latest University of Cape Town report, 3 out of 4 children go hungry every day because 30% of our population live in poverty with food insecurity. This results in lack of concentration in school or children up not coming to school. We sat down with the spokesperson of Peninsula School Feeding Association which was formed in 1958 as an aid to reduce short term hunger thus enhancing children’s ability to learn through school feeding and increase school attendance. PSFA addresses hunger in students attending primary, secondary and special needs schools as well as Orphaned & Vulnerable Children Centres (OVCs), Early Childhood Development Centres (ECDs) and Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges (TVETS) in the Western Province. With 61 years of experience, the Peninsula School Feeding Association has managed to feed 26 433 children with 163 schools on their  feeding programme. 
For more information:
Phone : +27 (21) 447 6020
Fax: +27 (21) 447 6047
Email : info@psfa.org.za
Physical Address: 26 Purdey Road, Sheffield Business Park, Philippi, 7750
Postal Address: PO Box 154, Observatory 7935 

How is your mental health?


Health is an important aspect of life and while the focus is mostly on taking care of our bodies by means of dieting, exercising and cutting down on harmful habits like drinking and smoking, good health also means good mental health. Mental health has to do with the quality of our lives and the way that we get along - in our families, at school, at work, and at play. Mental health problems are common in societies with as many as one in six South Africans suffering from anxiety, depression or substance-use problems. While stress is your body’s way of responding to any kind of demand or threat it can be one of the contributing factors of depression as well as anxiety if not treated accordingly. South Africa’s mental healthcare resources are wholly unequipped to handle the burden placed on them. South African Depression and Anxiety Group (SADAG ) claim that less than 16% of sufferers receive treatment for mental illnesses. We spoke to the spokesperson of Cape Mental Health, Dylan Oktober which is an organisation that runs awareness, education, counselling and training programmes aimed at helping people enjoy good mental health.

For more information on Cape Mental Health:

Physical address:22 Ivy Street, Observatory
Postal address: Private Bag X7, Observatory 7935
Telephone: 021 447 9040 (International +27 21 447 9040 )
Fax: 021 448 8475 (International +27 21 448 8475 )
Email: info@cmh.org.za

Sunday, July 28, 2019

Giving young black female scientists a voice

They say "Behind every successful woman there is a tribe of other successful women who have her back." This is clearly evident when we spoke to Ndoni Mcunu who is founder as well as CEO of the Black Women in Science NPC on the 15th April 2019. Ndoni Mcunu, a PhD Candidate at Witwatersrand University who was awarded the prestigious Mandela Washington Fellowship in 2017 representing one out of 63 South African leaders who were chosen to participate in this programme out of approximately 6 000 applications. She is not only a PHD candidate with a particular focus in agriculture as well as climate change but she the Founder & CEO of Black Women in Science (BWIS), a registered non-profit organisation which aims to deliver capacity development interventions that target young black women scientists and researchers.

Black Women in Science is a space in which young black women can come together, share knowledge and encourage each other in an industry that is deemed "male dominated".

For more information visit:
https://bwiselement.com/

Instagram: @bwis_element
Twitter: @BWIS_SA
Facebook: @BlackWomenInScience

Can a pregnancy test determine testicular cancer?


According to Men’s Foundation 2017, Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in young men aged 15 – 39 years. 53 new cases were diagnosed in South Africa in 2007. The five-year relative survival rate is over 95% for men with testicular cancer in South Africa. On the 10th April 2019, we spoke to author and founder of Love Your Nuts, Torsten Koehler. 

Torsten Koehler  was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 1995 ironically whilst educating young teenagers about sex education at a school where he was employed as a teacher. 

His journey of survival resulted in him publishing a book where he was "openly confronting his thoughts and emotions, relating the reactions of his friends, family and not least, his students, who gave him enormous help and hope" The German version of his book “Love your nuts” was published in Germany in 2004 and thereafter in English in 2011.

Love Your Nuts (LYN) is a registered non-profit testicular cancer awareness campaign based in South Africa. The goal of Love Your Nuts is to raise awareness of (testicular) cancer by educating communities about the rarely spoken about cancer that often remains undetected in young adults due to our diverse society in South Africa, where cultural taboos, stigmas and a lack of knowledge about the subject is widespread. 


For more information visit:
http://www.love-your-nuts.com

Are schools still safe?


Violence in schools is growing at an alarming rate, where 17 stabbings were reported in Western Cape schools alone in the first term of 2019. On the 8th April,we sat with Juliette Grant a child, Parent and Adolescent therapist from The Cape Town Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Group.
The Cape Town Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Group 

is a professional non-profit organisation established in 1994. It consists of approximately 30 psychotherapists, all of whom practice psychoanalytically informed psychotherapy with children and adolescents. The organisation aims to provide a structure for the professional development of psychotherapists working with children and adolescents. Members receive ongoing psychoanalytic education, specifically around the practice of psychotherapy with children and adolescents.

For more information visit:
www.capechildadolescentpsychotherapy.co.za

Friday, January 25, 2019

Challenges of South African Education System

The biggest challenge facing South African Education is some of the children are coming out of school without the 3 basic R's of education which is ability to read ,write and arithmetic and South African teachers do not have the basic pedagogic and content knowledge competencies needed to impart the skills needed by our learners.

And today we had such discussion with  Tony Marshall the head master of Oude Molen Academy and Mr Tofeeq the senior lecture at City Varsity, we were talking about about Challenges of South African education system and how we can address such issues.


Thursday, January 24, 2019

Let's build our democracy by register to vote

Concerned by the negative responses and with the final registration weekend coming up we asked the Provincial Electoral Officer for the Electoral Commission of South AfricaReverend Courtney Sampson to speak with us and give us some input. #Register#PlayYourPart#Vote

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Art exhibition for change

Today we had a great conversation with Yanga Lingani, Yonela Kitse, Lwando Lese and Zizo they were telling us about their Art exhibition event that will be hosted on the second week of March 2019 at the Fugly art gallery in Town Two Khayelitsha.

The aim of the exhibition is to raise awareness on social issues that are affecting the society and youth, apart from the artworks they are going to have poet, and other activities to entertain people.


For more info:
Contact: Zizo Manona
Mobile: 079 531 2067

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Sainthood, interrogates all-boys school culture

Today We had a great conversation with Tiisetso Mashifane about a award winning play Sianhood which interrogates all boys school culture written and directed by her.

Tiisetso also explains adolescence is such an important developmental stage of one's life and we spend most of it at school and more often than not , we brush it off as something fleeting when it can be so defining to one's early adult character...that's what she said.

The Sainthood previews at the Baxter Golden Arrow Studio on 6 and 7 February, opens on 8th February until 23rd February 2019.

For information
Contact
Fahiem Stellenboom
Marketing Manager
Baxter Theatre Centre
Tel: +27 21 680 3971 (Direct)
Tel: +27 21 685 7880
Fax: + 27 21 689 1880
Mobile: +27 722 656 023